Beelink Pocket PC - P1 TV Box - Intel Z3735F running Windows 8.1

Discussion in 'Arts and Photography' started by JD666, Sep 22, 2015.

Share This Page

  1. JD666

    JD666 RAID Leader Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,584
    Likes Received:
    1,801
    Reputation:
    5,403
    Thanks to the initiation from Gearbest, this was a personal purchase. The Beelink Pocket PC had a lot of discussion going on the product page, and a number of videos were floating around. A device, the size of a phablet phone, running Windows 8.1, capable of Full HD 1080P output, with BlueTooth, Wi-Fi, 2xUSB ports, Audio(headset) out and a built-in Battery! Yep.

    IMG_8277.jpg

    The packaging is a very regular, thin cardboard case, with the inner container sliding out from the outer sleeve. The device in the model's back pocket is suggestive of the size and compact nature of this pocket PC.

    IMG_8279.jpg

    A sinisterly similar logo to Beats Audio.

    IMG_8280.jpg

    Hello Pocket PC. A nice foam surround to protect it from bumps and nicks.

    IMG_8283.jpg

    The Beelink Pocket P1 TV Box, is fascinatingly slim. Measuring 152 mm x 83 mm x 11.4 mm in size, it is the size of a phablet phone. Here's a comparo next to the BlackBerry Z30 -

    IMG_8295.jpg
    IMG_8284.jpg

    The front of the device is a plain black plastic cover. Nothing removable here. Good bit is that it comes with a protective plastic sheet, that can be peeled off later.

    IMG_8285.jpg
    The rear of the device is where all the action is. From L-R, it has 2x USB ports, Micro USB power port, Micro HDMI out, MicroSD card slot (for upto 32Gb cards), Audio (4 pin headset type) and Power button.

    There is a small blue indicator between the two USB ports that illuminates to indicate that the device is powered.

    The Beelink Pocket P1 TV box is well built, and feels great to hold. It is dense (does not flex or compress at any point). I tried to locate an opening to try and open it, but could not find anything without having to damage the exterior. It is similar to a portable hard drive (Some Sony models with a metal body come to mind).

    A good touch is the metal outer casing, which not only adds value to the whole build quality, but would also help in dissipating heat.

    IMG_8286.jpg

    There are two bundled accessories in the box.

    IMG_8287.jpg

    A power supply (with a connected Micro USB cable), and a Micro HDMI to standard HDMI cable. There is a quick connectivity guide sheet as well.

    IMG_8288.jpg

    The power output is 5V-2 Amps, which can be seen on most Tablet chargers today. The build quality of the power supply and the cable is not the greatest out there, but should last for a reasonable time. It could've been better, especially when you compare it to the build quality of the Pocket PC itself.

    I ran into a bit of issue with the supply. The two pin plug was not stable in my Belkin Surge Guard board, so I used my InnJoo tablets 2Amp charger with a Micro USB cable to power this on. I would put it down to the power port, and not to the adapter.

    IMG_8293.jpg

    A gripe I do have, is that the power cable is too short. Probably around 3 Feet. So if you're trying to mount this Pocket PC behind your LCD, allow for this short coming. It can be overcome by using a longer power cable, but that would entail arranging for an alternate power source.

    The HDMI cable is of standard length (1.1 M I think) and is more than sufficient for usage.

    I hooked up my Logitech receiver (Keyboard + Mouse) to this, and powered it up. Powering up was super fast, with a custom BeeLink splash screen -

    IMG_8291.jpg

    Kindly ignore the mess in the reflection. :D

    IMG_8292.jpg

    Setup was standard Windows 8 and was completed in no time. I quickly installed K-Lite and CPU ID to get an idea of the system. I must mention that the system was fast and responsive and totally felt like a regular entry level Laptop, and not a pocket juice sipper.

    CPUZ 01.jpg

    Here is a CPU-Z screen shot. The BeeLink Pocket P1 TV Box features an Intel Atom Z3735F processor, which is a Quad core, running at 1.33 Ghz. The good bits are the 2MB L2 cache shared between 2 cores on either side. As you can see, the core voltage is extremely low at 0.4V.

    The good bits about this processor are that it supports 64 Bit processing, and has a max TDP of 2.2 W, which makes it ideal for such applications. The not so great bit is that the integrated graphics are at par with Intel HD4000, so expect nothing more than 1080P playback. It supports a maximum of 2 Gigs of DDR3 Ram, which this PC came with -

    CPUZ 03.jpg


    CPU-Z has a new tab for Benching in their latest version 1.73. I ran this to compare the performance of this vs the InnJoo Tab, which also runs an Intel Atom Processor, and a recently purchased Dell, which incidentally also runs a Quad core.

    CPUZ 04.jpg

    The score for the Beelink Pocket P1 TV Box was 117 for single thread, and 294 for Multi Thread operations.

    Comparing this with the InnJoo Tablet -

    Capture.JPG

    The InnJoo runs a similar CPU, however with 1 gig of RAM. The score was exactly less by 1 point on both accounts, being 116 for single thread, and 293 for Multi thread processing.

    DELL CPUZ.jpg

    The performance of the Dell Laptop was much higher, with a score of 303 and 878 for single thread and multi thread respectively.

    Next up, I did a set up of Media player classic with everything at default. I ran a few 1080P samples, and checked the stats. Did not find a frame drop at all, which was great.

    The pocket PC did not heat up much, and I was able to multi-task easily. I had a few tabs open in IE, and the video sample running in the background, and at no point did it feel that it was sluggish or lagging.

    I still have to test this with a 60 frame per second video sample.

    A good bit, I was able to hook up a 500 Gb portable hard drive to the USB port, and it was detected and I could read-write from/to it. So if you're using a low power portable drive, you can hook it up directly without issues.

    After installation, you have about 21 Gb of free space on the Pocket PC. Now this is more than sufficient to run Windows Media Center, Office 365, And some you-know-what-kind of softwares.

    I would ideally connect a powered Hard drive, and stick this Pocket PC to the back of my TV with Double sided tape.

    Another plus, the built in battery. So if you power cuts or drops in your area, it does not shut down like a regular PC. I only got a percentage notification, and not a notification of how much time was remaining, but users online have reported that this has a 2200 mAH battery, which should be good for 1-2 hours at the very least.

    At a price of 107$ or about 7000 INR, this makes for a great deal!

    Hope you liked this review and quick look!
     
  2. JD666

    JD666 RAID Leader Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,584
    Likes Received:
    1,801
    Reputation:
    5,403

Share This Page